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Past Research

LOCAL (ECOLOGICAL) KNOWLEDGE.

During 2010-2013, local (ecological) knowledge of Kaipara moana estuarine and coastal species, habitats, and environmental changes was researched. Face-to-face interviews were carried out with people (men, women, Māori, nonMāori) whom had an intimate, inter- and/or -generational connection and knowledge of Kaipara moana. This included people who fished, collected shellfish, lived by/on/with Kaipara, tribal leaders and were guardians and kaitiaki.

Over the next few weeks (of April 2020) I will upload aspects regarding methodology and methods, findings and analysis.

This information has not been published elsewhere. It has sat in the unpublished thesis since 2013. The research formed part of my previous attempt at a PhD where the thesis was examined and was not accepted. Is it “acceptable” and “robust” science? I leave you to answer this this yourselves.

I give this information and analysis to you.

Figure: Digitising using GIS (ArcMap software) knowledge collected.

CLASSIFICATION of KAIPARA ECOSYSTEMS.

Figure 1. Map of Kaipara moana showing rapid assessment survey sites. (n=405)

Between Feb 2009 and May 2010 I carried out a rapid estuarine assessment of the Kaipara moana, main (salt) rivers and the immediate coastal ecosystem at the entrance to the Kaipara (see Map above). This was in response to the degradation crisis facing the Kaipara moana and the relatively poor understanding of the types of habitats, species and status of these within Aotearoa’s largest estuarine ecosystem. The wider political, community and tribal aspirations were also a consideration in undergoing this research.

My friends and colleagues were stunned by my research objectives asking, “why are you doing a habitat classification of the Kaipara? Its just mud!” My response was, “how do you know it is just mud? Have you documented habitats of the Kaipara?” No such broad scale assessment had never been completed despite the ecological crisis and the violence delivered to Kaipara nature and to those identifying with the Indigenous Māori culture and tribe of Ngati Whatua through the loss and ongoing settler-colonialism of their sacred taonga.

Over the next few weeks (of April 2020) I will upload aspects regarding methodology and methods, findings and analysis.

This information has not been published elsewhere. It has sat in the unpublished thesis since 2013. The research formed part of my previous attempt at a PhD where the thesis was examined and was not accepted. Is it “acceptable” and “robust” science? I leave you to answer this yourselves.

I give this information and analysis to you.

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